Metternich court

Metternich court

  • English
    • German
    • French
    • Dutch

The Metternich court is one of the eight noble courts in Nierstein.

It dates back to the year 1456. And that means it is the oldest secular building in Nierstein. A stronghold! And you can guess its age but its scars. The court has endured lot during the past 500 years. Axel Schwarz, today’s owner of the court – and, not coincidently, a member of Nierstein’s History Association, tells us more.

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
This house was built as a medieval residential- and defense tower. Originally it had one more floor on top of it. Nierstein did not have a protective city wall, so you had to rely on a houses in which you could defend yourself.

All right, "My home is my castle," or in this case: “My Castle is my home!” Thick walls were needed indeed here, due countless attacks, wars and raids. As you can see, the fortified building has been reconstructed and expanded various times. Originally it was much more constructed for defense.

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
This fortified house had a drawbridge with which one could protect oneself from attackers. That is a draw door which was pulled up with a rope so that one could enter the house only at the first floor.

In the past few decades, however, the owner had to cope with a different problem: the ravages of time!

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
Here on these pictures we can see what the Metternichhof looked like before we started restoring the building in 1993. This is the ballroom, which was in a very bad condition ...
... but which looks proper again today after a lot of elbow-grease, and thanks to the support of the State Agency of Monument Preservation.

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
Another special feature of this room are the wall paintings, which date from the 16th century. The older version, the reddish version, originates from the first half of the 16th century, the second version was painted over on the first version at the end of the Renaissance in the second half of the 16th century.
“Wallpapers” about 1550 AD… During the restauration the paintings were meticulously treated with brush and tweezers. Also preserved are the loopholes for the weapons - arches in earlier days and later firearms. There is one loophole for each cardinal direction.
But the court yet offers another mystery. The old secret passages are still preserved deep underground. A complex tunnel system still connects Nierstein’s nobel courts to this day. Some tunnels are high enough to lead cattle and horses through them. One of the main corridors leads to the fortified Martin’s church nearby, which offered protection in former times when the house could no longer be held.

Oh, and in the 1970s, an official demolition permit for Metternichhof existed! Fortunately, nobody made use of it.

Route to the next station:

Evangelical Reformed School

Metternich court

  • English
    • German
    • French
    • Dutch

The Metternich court is one of the eight noble courts in Nierstein.

It dates back to the year 1456. And that means it is the oldest secular building in Nierstein. A stronghold! And you can guess its age but its scars. The court has endured lot during the past 500 years. Axel Schwarz, today’s owner of the court – and, not coincidently, a member of Nierstein’s History Association, tells us more.

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
This house was built as a medieval residential- and defense tower. Originally it had one more floor on top of it. Nierstein did not have a protective city wall, so you had to rely on a houses in which you could defend yourself.

All right, "My home is my castle," or in this case: “My Castle is my home!” Thick walls were needed indeed here, due countless attacks, wars and raids. As you can see, the fortified building has been reconstructed and expanded various times. Originally it was much more constructed for defense.

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
This fortified house had a drawbridge with which one could protect oneself from attackers. That is a draw door which was pulled up with a rope so that one could enter the house only at the first floor.

In the past few decades, however, the owner had to cope with a different problem: the ravages of time!

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
Here on these pictures we can see what the Metternichhof looked like before we started restoring the building in 1993. This is the ballroom, which was in a very bad condition ...
... but which looks proper again today after a lot of elbow-grease, and thanks to the support of the State Agency of Monument Preservation.

Axel Schwarz, owner of Metternichhof:
Another special feature of this room are the wall paintings, which date from the 16th century. The older version, the reddish version, originates from the first half of the 16th century, the second version was painted over on the first version at the end of the Renaissance in the second half of the 16th century.
“Wallpapers” about 1550 AD… During the restauration the paintings were meticulously treated with brush and tweezers. Also preserved are the loopholes for the weapons - arches in earlier days and later firearms. There is one loophole for each cardinal direction.
But the court yet offers another mystery. The old secret passages are still preserved deep underground. A complex tunnel system still connects Nierstein’s nobel courts to this day. Some tunnels are high enough to lead cattle and horses through them. One of the main corridors leads to the fortified Martin’s church nearby, which offered protection in former times when the house could no longer be held.

Oh, and in the 1970s, an official demolition permit for Metternichhof existed! Fortunately, nobody made use of it.

Route to the next station:

Evangelical Reformed School

Also available in: Deutsch Français Nederlands